A Movie in New York City

Some movies are better with a crowd. A hilarious comedy or an Avengers-style action romp or a truly terrifying frightfest are improved by the collective laughter and unexpected jumps of an engaged audience. Many other movies, though, are best seen alone.

Advertisements

Unreliable Perspectives

I wish more movies and books in the popular canon indulged in unreliable perspectives. While common wisdom claims this is the generation of irony, earnest narrators and protagonists remain quite in vogue. There is nothing wrong with sincerity, and in fact I frequently prefer it to irony which in the hands of lesser artists is nothing more than a feeble cover for having nothing to say. But fiction (and non-fiction, for that matter) benefits from a willingness to suggest, “Here’s one perspective, but it’s just one of many, and maybe it’s not even a very good one.”

The Art Diet: A Changing Meal

Any consumption of art is an act of exclusion. When you wander the aisles of a bookstore, scroll your Netflix queue or open Spotify, you are presented with a sea of choices and you narrow it down based on internal criteria. You could spend your entire life devoted to consuming art and you’d still never … Continue reading The Art Diet: A Changing Meal

Roger Ebert and the Beauty of Art Criticism

This week, we lost one of the greatest film critics to ever live. Roger Ebert was a legend in the world of cinephiles, and even casual movie fans know the iconic 'Thumbs Up/Thumbs Down' review that he and the late Gene Siskel made famous on their seminal review show, "At The Movies." The man who … Continue reading Roger Ebert and the Beauty of Art Criticism